A fire fighter from the Navajo Nation Fire Department demonstrates the gear they use on-duty to students from the Tse’hootsooi’ Elementary School in Fort Defiance, AZ on October 13, 2011. 

A fire fighter from the Navajo Nation Fire Department demonstrates the gear they use on-duty to students from the Tse’hootsooi’ Elementary School in Fort Defiance, AZ on October 13, 2011. 

A young fancy shawl dancer moves to the drum beat during UNM-Gallup Native American Club’s fall Pow Wow 2012 in Gallup, New Mexico.

A young fancy shawl dancer moves to the drum beat during UNM-Gallup Native American Club’s fall Pow Wow 2012 in Gallup, New Mexico.

Keeping Vigil over the Navajo Kinaalda Cake

Keeping Vigil over the Navajo Kinaalda Cake

Navajo String Games - Robert Johnson, Diné (Navajo) Culture Specialist, demonstrates the intricacies of the String Game during the Navajo Nation Museum’s Diné String Game educational event in Window Rock, Arizona.
In the traditional Navajo life-way, it is taught that when an individual commits to knowing the String Games, that individual’s memory skill will increase, build patience and develop wisdom. These abilities were a gift lain dormant within each Navajo by the Navajo deity, Spider Woman. In a traditional Navajo’s matriarchal worldview, Spider Woman is the deity who taught the Navajo how to weave.
In some regions of Navajoland, the Geo-symmetric designs seen in the string formations are meant to bring Hózhó, the combination of beauty, balance and harmony.

Navajo String Games - Robert Johnson, Diné (Navajo) Culture Specialist, demonstrates the intricacies of the String Game during the Navajo Nation Museum’s Diné String Game educational event in Window Rock, Arizona.

In the traditional Navajo life-way, it is taught that when an individual commits to knowing the String Games, that individual’s memory skill will increase, build patience and develop wisdom. These abilities were a gift lain dormant within each Navajo by the Navajo deity, Spider Woman. In a traditional Navajo’s matriarchal worldview, Spider Woman is the deity who taught the Navajo how to weave.

In some regions of Navajoland, the Geo-symmetric designs seen in the string formations are meant to bring Hózhó, the combination of beauty, balance and harmony.

The cedar stick and yucca lay idle during the 4th Annual Navajo Nation Museum Shoe Game Tournament in Window Rock, Arizona on Dec, 31st. 2012. In the Shoe Game, the 102 yucca stems are used to keep score and the cedar stick is used to strike a shoe, to indicate your guess. The game can be played for hours with no winners. For some families, his teaches their young Navajo children that no matter how cunning you can be, how diligent you can be, sometimes you can not win and accepting an impasse is a stark fact of life.
The shoe game is only played during the North American winter months.

The cedar stick and yucca lay idle during the 4th Annual Navajo Nation Museum Shoe Game Tournament in Window Rock, Arizona on Dec, 31st. 2012. In the Shoe Game, the 102 yucca stems are used to keep score and the cedar stick is used to strike a shoe, to indicate your guess. The game can be played for hours with no winners. For some families, his teaches their young Navajo children that no matter how cunning you can be, how diligent you can be, sometimes you can not win and accepting an impasse is a stark fact of life.

The shoe game is only played during the North American winter months.

Members of the Northern Traditional drum group, Calling Eagle, lend their voices and drums to the second #IdleNoMore rally in Window Rock, Arizona on December 28, 2012.

Members of the Northern Traditional drum group, Calling Eagle, lend their voices and drums to the second #IdleNoMore rally in Window Rock, Arizona on December 28, 2012.

Indigenous Americans show their solidarity for Canada’s First Nations at a #IdleNoMore rally in Window Rock, Arizona, the capital of the Navajo Nation.

Indigenous Americans show their solidarity for Canada’s First Nations at a #IdleNoMore rally in Window Rock, Arizona, the capital of the Navajo Nation.

A Southern Cloth contestant waits for the drums to start during the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair’s Pow Wow in Tuba City, Arizona.

A Southern Cloth contestant waits for the drums to start during the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair’s Pow Wow in Tuba City, Arizona.

Team Roping at the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair Rodeo in Tuba City, Arizona.

Team Roping at the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair Rodeo in Tuba City, Arizona.

Navajo Cowboys abide in formation with the U.S., Arizona and Navajo Nation Flag during the start of night performance of the the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair Rodeo on Saturday, Oct. 20th, 2012.

Navajo Cowboys abide in formation with the U.S., Arizona and Navajo Nation Flag during the start of night performance of the the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair Rodeo on Saturday, Oct. 20th, 2012.

I Made a video with some of my photos from the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair’s Pow Wow in Tuba City, Arizona. I absolutely love these images. I personally think it’s some of my best Pow Wow work so far. This is why I’m sharing them. Moments like these cannot be witnessed by one bleak soul.

- Donovan


asks:
Hey man good photos

Thanks man. To answer the other question you asked in another PM, The equipment I use consists of a Canon EOS T3i, the Tamron AF 17-50mm F/2.8 XR Di-II LD SP Aspherical (IF) Zoom Lens, the Tamron SP AF 70-200mm F2.8 Di LD (IF) zoom lens, a Canon 50mm f/1.8 II prime lens and a Canon 430EX II Speedlite. I hope to upgrade to a full frame Canon body soon. I’m looking at the Canon 6D that just got released. I need more low light shooting capability and 6D just might suite that need.

A gruff Chicken dancer during UNM-Gallup’s Native American Club fall Pow Wow in Gallup, New Mexico.

A gruff Chicken dancer during UNM-Gallup’s Native American Club fall Pow Wow in Gallup, New Mexico.

From left to right: Yolanda Charley, Miss Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial [2012-2013], Wahleah Watson, Miss Indian UNM [2012-2013] and Amanda Martza, Miss Native UNM-Gallup [2012-2013] lead other royalties and contestants during UNM-Gallup’s Native American Club fall Pow Wow’s grand entry in Gallup, New Mexico.

From left to right: Yolanda Charley, Miss Inter-Tribal Indian Ceremonial [2012-2013], Wahleah Watson, Miss Indian UNM [2012-2013] and Amanda Martza, Miss Native UNM-Gallup [2012-2013] lead other royalties and contestants during UNM-Gallup’s Native American Club fall Pow Wow’s grand entry in Gallup, New Mexico.

A Southern Traditional contestant stares dauntlessly into the crowd during the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair’s Pow Wow in Tuba City, Arizona.

A Southern Traditional contestant stares dauntlessly into the crowd during the 44th Annual Western Navajo Fair’s Pow Wow in Tuba City, Arizona.